Whisky Review

Review: Canadian Club Premium Canadian Whisky (Vintage) by Jason Hambrey

Canadian Club Vintage 1.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
N/A
Distiller Hiram Walker (Windsor, Ontario)

This is our Canadian Club premium, but the bottles are old - these are from tax stamped versions produced up until the 1990s. It’s pretty neat - theoretically it’s the same product, but the taste of course has changed.

The marketing at the time was that of “lightness” which was revered in whisky in the 70s and 80s - and not just whisky, it was also a key theme of marketing at the time. On the 1983 bottling, it says on the back: “The lightest of all Canadian whiskies. It is blended before barrelling to give Canadian Club a unique lightness and smooth flavour that’s known the world over. In 87 lands, Canadian Club has been the whisky of choice wherever people gather. However you enjoy Canadian Club, its light taste, international legacy of premium quality and distinguished tradition is very much a part of today.”


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Tax Stamp 1983, Stamp number A8894386

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: N/A

A really buttery nose, with a really nice, slightly dank earthiness (similar to what is found today) but this is much more rounded, fruity, and leathery than the modern stuff. More: Vanilla extract, beeswax, leather, peach jam, mixed nuts, apricot jam, and fresh beets with some dirt still on them. The vanilla almost smells artificial – it is quite poignant. The spiciness is more reminiscent to me of older Armagnacs than whiskies. The modern bottlings are altogether different – rougher, lighter, and not as broad or vibrant. The palate comes through quite buttery, but with a nice touch of earthy rye, leather, and more earthiness. The end is quite vegetal (it’s nice!). There is a nice grain character that comes through on the palate which isn’t present on the nose. The finish has vanilla and a very nice mix of stone fruit jams. There is a nice touch of earthiness and hot spice (chilli) on the finish, but there are still notes I associate with older whiskies – leather and some old wet wood chips.

Very nice! Substantially better than the modern stuff.

Highly Recommended (49% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: N/A


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Tax Stamp 1981, Stamp number A68198124

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: N/A

The nose is dry, oaky, and herbaceous with a decent dose of stone fruit – peach, prune, plum - and a bit of vanilla and rich earth. That earthiness seems present in CC, even to this day. There are brief touches of tropical fruit, too, but the nose is a bit shy. The palate is spicy, with nice orange undertones, oaky vanilla, raisins, white pepper, and baking spice too.  It finishes with prunes, spice, and some more rich earth.

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: N/A


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Tax Stamp 1974, Stamp number A4943398

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: N/A

Now we are into 710 ml bottles.

This is very herbal, and quite a departure from the 1980s bottles. Dried and ground thyme, white pepper, toasting bread crumbs, dried lavender, light must, vanilla – and there’s something a bit soapy about it too. We have more – orange peel, dried savoury, and pencil lead.

The palate is quite light, with vanilla and more dried herbs. A very soft finish which is slightly woody, clean, and sweet. There is quite a nice mouthfeel, and it has a bit more of a porridge-like graininess than other CCs I’ve tried. It has a bit of the characteristic earthiness and spiciness of CC Premiums, but it isn’t as prominent. I found in earlier and later Canadian Clubs. The finish has a bit of a nice fresh grain character to it as well – barley, but also apple, thyme, and stale white pepper.

Not as broad as the CCs from the 80s. But, this one is integrated a bit better – I think, and it’s easier to drink. However, some of the notes are a bit odd - I wonder if it has spoiled in the course of its many years of storage.

It’s not good enough to fall in my “recommended” category, but I’d still give all the old whisky that you can find a go, if you find it.

Value: N/A


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Tax Stamp 1973, Stamp number D7324051

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: N/A

A 1.14 L bottle. Screw cap – I wonder if the larger bottles preserve the whisky better.

A very nice nose. Rich dark fruits, candied citrus peel, vanilla, prunes, white pepper, dry American white oak, orange peel, clove, and coco-cola. It almost has a bit of rum on the nose. The fresh orange zest is quite a nice touch. The palate has a nice core of vanilla and baking spice, but it’s surrounded with a nice grain character and more citrus. There is a light flash of rye at the end which is brilliant. The finish is oaky, grainy, and slightly sweet with a light molasses character and some vanilla. Very easy to drink, easy, and very nicely balanced.

Very nice stuff. I could have multiple drams of this in a row, if I lived solely by the desires of my tongue and nose.

Highly Recommended (49% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: N/A


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Tax Stamp 1971, Stamp number A9710103

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: N/A

This nose is again very herbal, full of thyme, oak, vanilla, light clean oak, pencil lead, and old white pepper. Orange, dried apricot, and dust – too. The palate is lightly sweet, with cola, licorice, pencil shavings, and some dark dried fruits. It still has a lot of dusty character, but also some unique notes – stale white flour and chocolate chip cookie dough (without the chocolate). The finish is sweet, with more dried fruit and a touch of clove, cinnamon, and dried apple!

It’s much more similar to the 1974 than anything else, but it isn’t quite as bitter or aggressive, and has a bit more elegance to it. But, then again, nothing like the 1973. As with the 1974, I wonder if it is spoiled - especially when the 1973 tastes so much better and doesn’t have the strong herbal notes. However, still drinkable.

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: N/A


Review: Lot No. 40 Cask Strength Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Lot no 40 cs.jpg
ABV
55.0-58.4%
Aging
Virgin Charred Oak
Recipe
100% Rye
Distiller Hiram Walker (Windsor, Ontario)

Here we have a rarity - a cask strength, 100% Canadian Rye whisky, well matured and released by a major producer. The only other bottle I can think of which fits into this category (so far) is Whistlepig's Boss Hog, an independent bottling from Alberta Distillers (though I must note that there are some notable young cask strength ryes from micro distilleries like Stalk & Barrel). Basically, it is the connoisseur's dream - this juice.  Given the splendor of the standard Lot no. 40, you'd expect this to do some good work too. Originally single casks of this were handed around at whisky festivals, but now we have an annual release - beginning in 2017 at a very commendable 12 years of age. The golden age of Canadian whisky is here!


Review (2016)

  • Batch: 05 05100 (55.8%)

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: June 2016

This sample was generously sent to me by Mark Bylok of whisky.buzz, who also reviewed this batch of Lot no. 40 CS.

Lots of onion pickle, in fact, in this tasting. Dill, floral rye, new wood, and lots of nuts - hazlenuts, walnuts, almond, clove, floral rye, black tea, terrific caramel, cinnamon, dried rose, dried hibiscus, praline, rosehip….

Brilliant tingling spices on the palate, with lots of spice, caramel, orange, clove, blood orange, cola, walnut…immense at cask strength and lots of rye! But it comes easy with lots of nut, tea, and oak notes surrounding. Some terrific dried floral notes too. Dries off in a huge, spicy finish still with lots of nuts and more light rye notes – almost jasmine-like in their floral nature - and cinnamon, tobacco, drying reeds in the fall, arugula, nut brittle, and some orange peel. Not to mention lots of continued floral notes. Not hard to drink and balanced at cask strength.

This is amazing – but I can only imagine a batch version. As it is, you can tell it is more of a single barrel given the profile and doesn’t quite have the breadth of complexity in some lot. No 40s, but it makes up for it with emphasis and magnitude.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I review to date get this recommendation or higher). To get a cask strength rye whisky of this complexity, depth, and breadth is just awesome.

Value: N/A (not available on the market)


Review (2017)

  • Batch: 1st Edition (4968 bottles)

  • Bottling Code: 54SL24 L17200 EW13:27

  • Bottling Date: 2017

What a whisky! What a nose. This is definitely Lot no. 40, and exactly what you would expect – a lot of punch and flavor! Coincidentally, natural colour too. Rich: caramel, lilacs, loads of spices, dried fruits, apricot, brioche, lilacs, clove, nutmeg, icing sugar...it gets better with air. The palate has lilacs, loads of rye, dried apricot, patchouli, cedar, dried apricot, black tea – wow. This batched version is better than the barrels I have tasted. The finish is loaded with rye and oak, along with dried fruit (prunes, raisins, dried apricot), cumin, lemon zest, orange peel (dried), icing sugar, fresh spinach, and a touch of dill.

This batch smells older and a bit more developed than the lot no. 40 which is on shelves now, though I think I’ve had a bad batch in my last bottle – but this still smells a bit more mature than the lot no. 40s on shelves now.  If you like Lot no. 40 (at all), you should buy this. Amazing whisky.

Exceptional (3% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date receive this, my highest recommendation). One of the best whiskies I’ve ever tasted - it’s mighty, complex, and incredibly moreish. If you want to see what great cask strength Canadian whisky can be, look no further than here.

Value: Very high. $70 CAD for something like this! Take a look at the best of the cask strength American ryes, as a comparator - you won’t find something to spar with this at this price (especially one with 12 years of age!).


Review (2018)

  • Batch: Second Edition (11 Years Old; 58.4%)

  • Bottling Code: 54SL24 L18204 EW1325

  • Bottling Date: 2018

Very different than last year’s release (but still lot no. 40) - it came from a different bond, and each bond has different characteristics. It is very fruity – strawberries, cherries, plums, prunes, and green apple – but also with floral notes – lilac, spice, clove, loads of brown sugar and oak. There’s a nice caramelized nut characteristic too, verging on corn – like candied pecans or caramel popcorn. Rich, deep oak opens up as it sits. Gorgeous. The sweet nature of the oak really comes out too – it is a nice complement to the massiveness of the whisky everywhere else.

The palate is rich, oaky, fruity – tons of lilac and tons of spice. It’s what you expect from the nose – but the fresh fruit character, like strawberry jam that has just started to boil when you make it – is central and exceptional. Still, it’s tempered by loads of spice and oak. Really big, even with water added. Also, a bit less of a “grip” and movement on the palate compared with last year, even with a bit less ABV. But, still absolutely awesome.

Really nice tannins on the finish, and dries out really well. Spices slowly unfold, alongside dried fruit, green apple skins, and tannins. The more you drink, the bigger and better it gets. Lovely.

In comparison – last year’s release was more woody, richer, and heavier – and you get the full range of coconut and rich nut oils and black tea there which aren’t as big here. Think spicy/oaky /floral/fruity vs fruity/spicy/floral/oaky in terms of flavour impact. And the fruit is more vibrant – like fresh berries – vs say berry jam. This is still epic, but I liked the darker richer character last year – and it was a bit deeper.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I review to date get this recommendation or higher). This is still an outstanding bottle, but it doesn’t have the depth or integration to take it to the level that the 2017 release was. Still, outstanding - incredibly big, fascinating, rich, and deep.

Value: High. An increase in price still leaves this as an excellent value buy, but increases in price could change this in the future.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Third Edition (57%)

  • Bottling Code: 119204EW132

  • Bottling Date: 2019

75% of this whisky is aged in French oak, and we’ve now lost our age statement. 3554 bottles produced.

The notes on the nose are so typical of the brilliant, intense, and complex lot no. 40. It’s very oaky, -much more oaky than the previous two editions – and it does quiet the volume on a few of those notes. Floral lilac, fennel, dried apricot, dried peach, apple, toasted rye bread, toasted malt, and an intense, slightly bitter, woodiness. The creamy, vanilla-focused oakiness almost makes the nose buttery - like butter whipped up with sugar and a touch of vanilla. I just love the floral notes here – very dense, very intense – almost dried in character. Rich, bright, grain notes emerge as it sits. The French oak is present – it adds a really spicy, slightly floral characteristic.

The palate follows – deep fruit, deep oak, deep spice. It’s HUGE, and it takes you on quite a ride. A nice rich caramel characteristic bind together the floral, spicy rye and the sharp, tight wood notes. Slightly bitter with the oak. Lots going on, from tropical notes of dried mango and cardamom to floral notes of lilac and rose to spicy characteristics of nutmeg and fennel to grainy notes to charred and toasted oak notes. I thought I might prefer this with less water to tame the oakiness, but I actually think it is better balanced at cask strength. It’s still a bit buttery, and has a dry-aged steak type savouriness which is quite nice. The finish has a lot of heft and displays all of the characteristics of the palate – but the oakiness here makes its best mark – spicy, sweet, evolving, and drying. Excellent finish. My favourite finish of any of the past three releases.

An oak bomb, combined with a distillate which is big enough to play the sparring character. It has a more youthful edge than the previous two editions (but the extra oak plays into that also).

These days, oaky whiskies are a bit of a rage – so I imagine this will be right up some people’s alley. It’s a bit too much for me, but it’s still thoroughly enjoyable. I really like the core of it, but even watered down to 43% I still like the regular lot no. 40 more – but it’s because it has more oak than I prefer, even though I would say this is a better whisky.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher). If you’ve never had this, you have to. Perhaps the most well-known cask strength rye in the world is Thomas Handy, but the Lot no. 40 CS is something I like more than most Handy releases – and I expect many would, especially rye-heads, if they could get their hands on it.

Value: High. My equations usually suggest this is in my “average” category but this is one of the few over-rides I give. Anyone who is serious about rye needs to try this stuff. I don’t like it as much as the previous years, but it is still awesome whisky which should be sought-out.

Curious about a second opinion? Check out Mark Bylok’s review at whisky.buzz


Review: Pike Creek 21 Year Old Double Barrel Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Pike Creek 21 Oloroso 3.jpg
ABV
45%
Aging
21 Years; Finished in Various Barrels
Recipe
Double Distilled Corn Whisky & Rye Whisky
Distiller Hiram Walker (Windsor, Ontario)

This is part of the very impressive “Rare Range” (previously Northern Border) collection, and, in the "Pike Creek" tradition which highlights the impact of finishing. In 2017, the release was finished in a scotch cask sourced through a chivas regal connection (both Pernod Ricard). They also sent over some lot no. 40 casks, for their finishing purposes - so if you see a "rye finish" somewhere in the chivas family/distillery set, it's a good chance it's lot no. 40.

In 2018, the whisky was finished in a variety of different oaks. About 50% of this blend was finished in French oak - both Quercas Robor and Quercas Petrea, about 25% of the blend was finished in Hungarian oak from the danube forest region (seasoned for 36 months), while the remainder was American oak. Each type of oak has a different set of characteristics, and the flavour compounds vary significantly - for example, in one sample of wood, vanillin was the highest in French oak, 20% less in American oak, and 35% less in Hungarian oak. Similar analysis can be done for other flavours - almond, smoky notes, etc. The finishing regime here highlights the breadth of oak, and, the best part is that it still isn’t too oaky.

In 2019, now, they’ve used a cask often used in whisky - but not often at Hiram Walker distillery - an Oloroso Sherry cask, bringing in classic sherry notes of dried fruit, rancio, spice, and some caramel to the old spirit.


Review (2017)

  • Batch: 2017 (Finished in a Speyside Malt Cask)

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2017

It smells old! And, indeed, it is. A rich nose, that just develops. Not really the same thing at all as it’s younger brother, the 10 year old pike creek finished in rum casks – the brand is about finishing, not about necessarily having the same profile (as when they switched from port to rum casks, but kept the brand the same). Not nearly with the same buttery, brown sugar notes of the rum finish. In fact, though they’re part of the same brand, I wouldn’t really compare them at all.

The whisky is largely double distilled corn whisky matured in reused casks...e.g., what is in Wiser’s 18 Year old, but a bit older and finished in a Speyside malt cask (take a guess... a Speyside from Pernod Ricard – Wiser’s also sent over some Lot no. 40 casks for them to use in finishing, though I haven’t seen the result of this yet). However, there’s also a bit of rye added in this time too. But, from the nose to the finish, a different whisky than the 10 year old.

The nose has rich blueberry, mushy peas, green apple, white grape, corn oil, and some old oak. Maple, toffee, candied nuts. The palate is very clean – light grain, celery seed, prune, with a finish that is slightly dry and spicy – an ever so light touch of either earthy barley or peat. Nice mouthfeel. Ever so lightly bitter on the finish – as I have found with most Pike Creeks, in fact. The finish, though, is still bright and fruity – mulberries, spices, and dried fruit (raisins, apricot). Finish isn’t very long, but is nice and grainy while it sticks around. A very nice whisky – those old age notes present in this whisky are continuing to attract me, and this blows the other pike creeks out of the park.

An interesting pour beside Wiser’s 18. Much lighter, more elegant, refined, and less spicy. But, better...Don Livermore, the master blender, said if he were to have two whiskies to sip from the Northern Border collection, he’d have Gooderham Little Trinity and Pike Creek 21. Interesting.

Terrific whisky. Fun to see Canadian whisky stepping up its game.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: 2018 Rare Range (Finished in European Oak Casks)

  • Bottling Code: 54SL24 L18235EW1202

  • Bottling Date: 2018

Oaky, through and through – and it’s nice. But it’s not the bourbon sort of oaky, where it’s loaded with new wood. Also not the Scottish “too oaky” – it has a huge kick of oak, complex, but it still sits lightly above a fairly vibrant, aged corn whisky underneath. It’s very nice – there are nice grain notes lurking underneath, and rich spices – green cardamom, nutmeg, clove. If you like oak, but in a broad sense (i.e. not just heavily caramelized oak) you’ll love this.

The palate has dried fruits, light spice, and some jujube-like fruitiness at the centre – but oak sits overtop everything – like a freshly sawn pile of oak. Earthiness finds its way into the centre of the palate before tannins take over and we are left with light, sweet corn, spice, and white grape. Honey, too – and sweetness opposes the light oak quite nicely.

The finish has a rich, dried flurry of spice – a mixed old bag of baking spice (clove, white pepper, nutmeg, green cardamom) and a kick of dried fruit that slowly unpacks itself alongside some toasted almond.

Natural comparators are last year’s Pike Creek, or this year’s Seasoned Oak – a 19 year old whisky finished in seasoned oak. At a very basic level, this is more oaky, the seasoned oak is much more fruity and seems to have more influence from vibrant rye, and last year’s Pike Creek 21 has light barley overtones like Scotch (as one might expect) – think applesauce and green apple.

I like this a lot more than last year’s release (which was also great). Highly recommended. Also, I prefer the seasoned oak release, which is in a similar category (old finished corn whisky) but quite different.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: 2019 Rare Range (Finished in Oloroso Sherry Casks)

  • Bottling Code: L19232EW1342

  • Bottling Date: 2019

This is finished in Oloroso sherry casks, and there are only 4481 bottles produced.

It definitely as a reddish hue from the sherry. No more twine on this bottle – I guess we are headed for a more elegant look.

Rich, woody, old age whisky aromas with a very pleasant fruitiness from the sherry. I was a little worried that the whisky would be too strongly influenced by sherry – not so! It’s quite well integrated. I suppose I shouldn’t have been surprised – old, light corn whisky would just get choked completely out by big sherry.  We have the usual, ethereal notes – but now lots more fruit and sherry-caramel: vanilla, light rum, apple seeds, and a really nice oaky earthiness – I guess a bit like decomposing, wet, wood that crumbles in your hand.

The palate is big and woody, with a load of dried fruit coming in near the mid-palate, followed by freshly cut wood and finally some oxidized wine notes. Largely the notes are as expected, but I find the texture is interesting - it’s quite woody with a good dose of structure from the tannins, but it also has a syrupy sweetness from the sherry. The finish is oaky, slightly tannic, with rich caramel-like sherry and some oxidized wine notes. Nicely done! With time, the wood dies out and the sherry remains – and it’s very nice. Tingly tannins keep you reaching for more, which I always like (until the bottle is done!).

Quite a nice effort. I find I prefer it without added water, which just brings out the woodiness even more – but a drop or two to bring it to 43% works well. I don’t know if sherry is the perfect match for the spirit – but it’s just about exactly what I want from a special release – a variation on the theme of Pike Creek while doing something different that pushes the boundaries a little. That being said, it’s a very good match nonetheless and I quite like what it does to the spirit. I’d love to see a first-fill ex-bourbon finish one of these days, but perhaps that would be too sweet.

It took me a few times to nail this review and decide what I thought - which isn’t typical, and is always a good thing – because I feel I need multiple assessments to actually cover the range of what is in the glass.

 I quite liked what they did last year with the various oaks, and I thought that release was brilliant and very interesting. This, obviously, is less wood-focused and has a very different focus, and may appeal to nostalgic scotch drinkers very well. My favourite Pike Creek to date, and my favourite of the Rare Range/Northern Border Collection this year.

Very Highly Recommended (19% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: High. $90 for 21 years of age, well crafted, and complex? Yes please.

Curious about another review? Check out Mark Bylok’s review on Whisky.Buzz.


Review: Gooderham & Worts 49 Wellington 19 Year Old Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Gooderham & Worts 49 Wellington (2).jpg
ABV
49%
Aging
Various Casks
Recipe
Wheat, Rye, Barley & Corn, Whiskies
Distiller Hiram Walker (Windsor, Ontario)

Now here is something unique - a blend to honour the original HQ of Gooderham & Worts at 49 Wellington st. in Toronto - made with a blend of various whiskies including some matured in red oak! This is something that isn’t often seen, and it’s the first bottling I’ve tasted using red oak. When I was at Hiram Walker a few years back, I got to taste some whisky made out of red oak casks (they didn’t leak, surprisingly!) - it was quite unique and I remember thinking it had a brown rice characteristic which was a bit unique.

But, enough about just the red oak - this stuff is 19 years old and a blend of 4 different grains with a bit of focus on wheat. However, wheat is still one of the “small grains” here, with corn being dominant.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: 49 Wellington (2019 Rare Range)

  • Bottling Code: L19225EW1326

  • Bottling Date: 2019

The nose is very rich – sweet caramels, a grain character, biscuits, shortbread, oat cookies, and a bit of brown rice. I actually find the nose difficult a bit elusive, in part because it’s relatively light -  but it’s clear that there is lots there as in previous years and it does open up in the glass. I tackled this in multiple glasses and multiple tastings.  Sweet biscuits, whole wheat noodles, vanilla, clove, baking spices, pine, macadamia nuts, cream of wheat, apple, oak, light earth, maple (it really grows with time), and a nice savouriness. Cleaner and more refined than last year’s excellent Eleven Souls.

The palate is very rich and viscous with a light thread of spice and tannin for a good bit of structure. There is creamy butter icing, light oak, dried apricots, plums, orange zest, and a nice wheat finish which is incredibly soft and delicate. Quite grain forward, but very elegant and subtle. Lots of maple, once again.

Black tea notes, macadamia nuts, and dried fruit notes come out in the finish alongside toasted oak notes and some apple seeds. A very pleasant tingle, too.

Is it perhaps too easy to drink? This is so clean and simple at first glance that one might forget to look under the hood and see everything that is there.

I like this more than the first Gooderham northern border release, but it’s a toss up as to whether I like it more than the eleven souls (as with many whiskies, it’s a mood thing).

Very Highly Recommended (19% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher). Very nice stuff.

Value: Average. But if you’re anything like me, you’re curious about what red oak does to a whisky and that’s pretty rare…

Curious about a second opinion? Check out Mark’s review at whisky.buzz.


Review: Shelter Point Single Cask Quail's Gate Foch Reserve Finish by Jason Hambrey

Shelter+Point+Foch+Finish+2.jpg
ABV
46%
Aging
Finished in Quail's Gate Foch Reserve Wine Casks
Recipe
100% Malted Barley
Distiller Shelter Point (Vancouver Island, British Columbia)

Marechal Foch is not a common wine for the table, but they grow quite a bit of it in BC. It is originally a hybrid grape variety originating in France, but it often has a really intense characteristic. It’s grown in Loire, in France, but you see it more often in North America and there are a number of BC producers. I’ve had a few foch wines, and I often have thought that they might make good whisky casks. Well, here we are!

This was a limited single cask bottling, with only 228 bottles produced from the barrel and released in 2019.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Single Cask Release No. 2

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2019

At the nose – we have what is very much a shelter point single malt.  I do like what the wine casks do to the spirit. Brown sugar, blackberries, currants, black cherries – but also some dried peach, baking spice, and dried ginger. A nice dried cherry note, too. Relatively bright for a finished shelter point, with a softer fruit and oak character. It softens with time. The palate is full of fruit- almost “juicy” but also has toffee, dried ginger, brown sugar and a bit of wine tannins. Baking spice builds into the finish. Lots of spices on the palate.

It’s good both without water and with a drop or two. It softens and opens up, but loses a bit of its (nice) edge with water so it’s a tradeoff.

I can’t resist but compare to the double barreled with the pinot noir cask, which is a bit richer, darker and denser (not always a good thing). This is quite a bit lighter in colour. I find the double barreled oakier, spicier, and bigger with more of a dried fruit characteristic. This single barrel focuses more on lighter fruit – stone fruit and berries. Oddly enough, I would have thought the casks – pinot noir and foch, would have given the whiskies the opposite of the characteristics that they achieved.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher). this is very nice, and a nice example of what a single barrel can do.

Value: Average. A pretty good price for a pretty good whisky, competing against all whiskies. If single malts are your thing, this is a better than average value buy in my opinion.


Review: Fuyu Blended Japanese Whisky by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
N/A
Distiller N/A

This whisky has shown up in Ontario and Quebec, and very little is known about it. That always makes me a bit nervous with Japanese whisky, which is quite unregulated - you can blend other types of whisky (like Scottish or Canadian) together in Japan and still call it Japanese whisky. This, however, is partly (if not all) from Japan. The Japanese whisky scene, in Canada at least, has never been big but has taken a sad turn in the last few years with more brands popping up but of questionable quality.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2018

This actually smells rather Canadian to me- like some of the cheaper corn-heavy, lightly spicy blends with notes of white pepper, orange peel, coriander, clove, and some dried chickpeas. The palate is spicy, a bit dry, and a bit sweet. Overall, it’s fairly light in body. The finish remains spicy, a touch sweet, with a bit of oak and more dried citrus peel coming through. It has a relatively short finish. The spiciness and dry-ness are mildly appealing as you drink more.

I wanted to review this in part to say this:  I don’t think it’s a good expression, nor necessarily very representative, of good Japanese whisky. There are lots of newcomers to Japanese whisky who might, upon seeing a nicely packaged Japanese whisky for $70, jump at the chance. But, it’s not something I’d pay $70 for, nor would recommend. It’s an analog for what I see often with Canadian whisky – Canadian whisky is often not available overseas and the expressions available are not representative of the styles and whiskies I’d recommend.

Value: Low. 70$ is a lot to pay, especially when I could recommend some similar profile Canadian whiskies which are better and cost $25.


Review: Ohishi Sherry Cask Japanese Rice Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Ohishi+1.jpg
ABV
40.8%
Aging
Sherry Cask
Recipe
Malted and Unmalted Rice
Distillers Ohishi Distillery (Hitoyoshi, Japan)

Now here is something to write home about - a Japanese whisky distilled wholly from a mixture of malted and unmalted rice! It certainly has my interest piqued! There is actually a lot of distilled rice in Japan - usually shochu which is typically bottled above 25% but below 40%. However, this is a bit odd - because it’s distilled from rice, it wouldn’t be naturally associated with “whisky” (though it fits the definition), but because it’s aged, it wouldn’t naturally be associated with shochu. Notably, a large portion of the grain used in this whisky is grown on the distillery estate. And, like a few stills in Canada, the pot still is made of stainless steel, not copper.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2018

A very rich, unique nose – licorice root, tamarind, dried rice, soy sauce, prunes, plaintain, apple seeds, and a bit of sherry. Terrifically unique. The palate is fruity, with a big sherry influence but also lots of rice notes and even some kidney bean. The finish is similarly interesting, with loads of rice notes, dried fruit, and spice.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher). On a taste persepective, this just gets a “highly recommended” score, but I just think it’s so fantastic to taste a nice Japanes whisky, made from rice– a rarity for a Canadian without much access. This is very Japanese in a way I haven’t yet experienced in whisky, which is terrific.

Value: Average. Nice stuff, but Japanese whisky doesn’t go for cheap….this is about $107 CAD.


Review: Two Brewers Classic Yukon Single Malt Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Image courtesy of Two Brewers, photographed by Michal Kostal.

Image courtesy of Two Brewers, photographed by Michal Kostal.

ABV
46%-58%
Aging
7-8 yrs
Recipe
100% Malted Barley - mostly pale malt
Distiller Two Brewers (Whitehorse, Yukon)

Two Brewers is an interesting distillery because they started (as in the name) in brewing, so they had expertise in that important flavor generating part of the whisky making process. Their whiskies are about 7-8 years old, very mature for a micro distillery compared to most which are releasing their product as soon it is legal to do so, after three years. They also run with four different streams of single malt - "classic", "peated", "special finishes" and "innovative" whiskies. Each release has about 800-1600 bottles per release, and they use different malted and roasted grains along with varying fermentation techniques and a mix of barrels to get the sort of flavors they want. It's about time for a taste!


Review (2016)

  • Batch: Release 01

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2016

A Yukon-only release. Earthy, and lightly smoky, with apple, pineapple, pepper – the earthy and smoky elements of the nose lifts off with time leaving heavy fruit and porridge behind. The palate continues on with some very interesting elements – vegetal notes, yet still holding on to tingling spice and earthy grain. Nicely done!

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average.


Review (2017)

  • Batch: 06

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2017

The nose is incredible. Remarkable fruity – loads of ripe yellow apple, ripe pear, pineapple, guava, custard – and yet full of underlying spicy bready notes. There’s a bit of sharp grassy spice and some unripe green pear, as well as hard banana candies. It’s quite complex and very well integrated. It doesn’t nose or taste immature at all. The palate is gorgeous – it has some vanilla but finishes with some rich, dark, roasted malt. Great underlying grain and earth, too. The finish, then, maintains all the fruit but is loaded with roasted malt notes and light spice and oak. Figs, too. Brilliant!

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: High. This is just good enough to scrape into a high value category, even at $100.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: 10, 58%

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2018

Our first cask strength two brewers!

This is what you might expect – a solid two brewers classic single malt, but with a much bigger paintbrush. Apple juice, apricot jam, tropical fruits, and all the beautiful grainy notes. It smells much like a bourbon cask – creamy, herbal, and lightly oaky. On the palate – it’s awesome. Big, creamy, with tropical fruits balanced by oaky spice, rich grain notes, and sharp spice. The finish comes out even bigger at cask strength, as might be expected. Lots of tropical fruits on the finish, too.

Not necessarily a better spirit than previous batches of the „classic” single malt, but it really gets carried through nicely at cask strength. It retains all the key notes, but adds some – the oaky spice and vanilla and caramel are front and center here, while they play a backburner at lower strengths. Well done – very well done.

As usual, the upped ABV reallly does well on the finish. I need to find a bottle of this....

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average. Really good whisky, but at $130 it starts to compete against other possibilities in that range.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Release 13

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2018

What a nose! This is loaded with caramel and vanilla, but still offset with light stone fruit, pineapple, banana, vanilla, and oak. The palate is creamy, rich, and with a very nice kick of spicy greens (arugula, watercress) before a drying finish which remains slightly sweet and fruity. Earthiness grows on the finish, still being offset by a bright fruitiness and spice. Compared to other batches, I find this has a huge degree of caramel and toffee, and a light elegance to it.

I loved batch 10, which was really big – this is perhaps a bit broader and richer, but not bigger.

Is this the best single malt in North America? Perhaps…

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average. Really good whisky, but at $100 it starts to compete against other possibilities in the $100 range.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Release 16

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2018

Sharp, grassy notes lead the nose, which is a bit closed at first. The nose is quite spicy and herbal, but it opens up with peach, dried apricot, and over-ripe plum. There is a slightly smoky oak aspect to it, and it becomes quite buttery as it sits. As much as I like the uniqueness in all of the Two Brewers “streams” I think the classic remains my favourite. It is just so wonderfully balanced between distillate and cask. The palate starts out sweet, with stone fruit, vanilla, and butterscotch growing before a herbal finish with baking spices and light wood tannins.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average, at $100 - really high quality stuff at a moderate price point.


Review: Two Brewers Special Finishes Yukon Single Malt Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Image courtesy of Two Brewers, photographed by Michal Kostal.

Image courtesy of Two Brewers, photographed by Michal Kostal.

ABV
43-46%
Aging
7-8 yrs in first cask, finished for about a year in finishing cask
Recipe
100% Malted Barley - mostly pale malt
Distiller Two Brewers (Whitehorse, Yukon)

The abv above is because the first release was 46%, the second was 43%. Here we have the terrific Two Brewers single malt - but this time finished in a variety of different casks, depending on the release - they say they hope no two releases will be the same. It is worth noting that the finishing period here is longer than typical - most barrel finishes are quite short (more like an "infusion") as most of the liquid remaining in the finishing barrel is absorbed in 90 days or so. The amount of liquid soaked into a finishing barrel is significant - barrels have gallons of soaked liquid in them once they are finished maturation. Thus, most distilleries aren't doing a whole lot more in finishing than adding in another ingredient, in a way that passes as legal because it's soaked into a barrel. However, a longer finish means also that you get a bit of maturation from a second, different, barrel, which means it really is more of a finish. This year long period of finishing means we get to see some of the effect of that.


Review (2017)

  • Batch: Release 02

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2016

Distilled in 2009 and finished in PX sherry barrels, 46% ABV.

Very green, and interesting - unripe pear, unripe banana, unripe mango, black pepper, soy sauce, and some sweet grain. The palate brings in lots of pineapple, yellow ripe apple, and a decent strength leading into orchard fruit and light smoke on the finish.

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average. Starts to compete with other $100 whiskies, which has quite a few of the best drams in the world.


Review (2017)

  • Batch: Release 04

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2016

Blended and finished in a bourbon barrel. 1440 bottles, at 43%.

The nose is vibrant and fruity with exotic fruit – guava, soursop – with some mint, vanilla, dried peach, sweet potato, and malt-driven beer notes. The palate has a sweet, malty core on top, middle fruit notes with peach and apple – all with an earthy, nutty edge to it. The end of the palate and finish is very vegetal – arugula and spice, reminding me quite a bit of rye. The finish is clean, spicy, and creamy with light earthy smoke, peach, almonds, and dried papaya.

This whisky is one with great texture, movement, and complexity – I highly recommend.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average. Starts to compete with other $100 whiskies, which has quite a few of the best drams in the world.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: Release 09

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2017

Finished in European PX barrels.

The nose is full of dried fruits – but more „standard” fruits for a single malt – raisins, prunes, dried apricots. Very sherry driven, with dried orange peel, sherry spices, and oxidized wine playing key parts in the nose. We also have rich grain, in the two brewers style, but it is subdued. Horseradish, too!

The palate is a bit less dominated by sherry, with a strong malty core and a classic spicy, grainy finish. It is still loaded with dried fruit – though the tropical fruits come through, too. The finish has rancio, dried fruit, and a sharp herbal characteristic – thyme and basil. And the herbal grain character comes through, too – I love it.

This is a nice whisky, but I think the cask dominates too much – the fruity, complex and tropical character of two brewers is taken over by a sherry cask which loads the experience with dried fruits, spices, and rancio – still very good, but I don’t think the best pairing for Two Brewers.

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average. Starts to compete with other $100 whiskies, which has quite a few of the best drams in the world.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: Release 15

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2019

Another sherry barrel finish. The nose starts with the typical bright fruit, notably peach this time, sharp grainy aromas, cinnamon, and rich and sweet stone-fruit wine notes. It has almost a dessert-like quality to it, but, oddly enough, it fits in really well into some of the earthy notes on the nose. The palate is rich, with oak coming in but offset against the grain and herbal notes. The finish has arugula, baking spice, and sherry.

I think this is probably my favourite of the sherry finishes to date. The nose, I find, is just about perfect and has a nice delicate balance between the components.

Very Highly Recommended (19% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average, as above.


Review: Four Roses Small Batch Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey by Jason Hambrey

four+Roses+Small+Batch+2.jpg
ABV
45%
Aging
Virgin Charred Oak
Recipe
Blend of OBSO, OBSK, OESO, and OESK Recipes
Distiller Four Roses (Lawrenceburg, Kentucky)

Four Roses distillery uses 5 proprietary yeast strains, and two mashbills (recipes), to produce 10 different bourbons which it produces and ages separately and then blends into their bourbons. This whiskey, Small Batch, is created from 4 of these recipes. These are the OBSO, OBSK, OESO, and OESK. The first two -“OB” recipes – utilize a high-rye mashbill: 60% corn, 35% rye, and 5% malted barley. The second two – “OE” recipes – utilize a lower-rye mashbill: 75% corn, 20% rye, and 5% malted barley.

The flavour impact of yeast – a fundamental ingredient for any sort of alcohol production isdemonstrated clearly in the different bourbon offerings by Four Roses. As for the yeasts, the two used in Small Batch are the Four Roses “O” (OBSO,OESO) and “K” yeasts (OBSK,OESK). The “O” yeast, according to Four Roses, contributes “delicate fruitiness” to the whiskey, while the “K” yeast contributes “slight spice” to the whiskey.


Review (2014)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2014

Nose: Some very nice honey plays into this one, and it is one of the first things I notice. Dried corn also seems to be quite present at the front of the nose, and there’s a slight background creaminess as well. Caramel, rich vanilla, and fruit – cherries, pears, – with a slight rose-y floral edge too! As for spice, there’s some fennel and black pepper. Some of the earthiness comes out in both the oak and the corn – as you can read, this is nicely complex and all the elements play very well together, and there’s loads of wonderful subtlety. Very enjoyable.

Taste: Sweet, with some dried corn coming through front and center along with some light fruitiness -cherry particularly, and a bit of grapefruit – and a tinge of a yeasty flavour as well. Some nice, lightly earthy oak toward the end as well. There’s some nice spice too – some cinnamon, sweet star anise, and some other light baking spices. There’s also a bit of an almost vegetal note to this – or perhaps herbal – mint, I suppose, but with a qutie vegetal characteristic beyond the lighter, menthol note. The grains are brilliant, too – you can taste the corn, and the candied nature of the rye is there very nicely. And a bit of a background cola note too. The movement and balance work well – sometimes the grassiness of the rye is a bit out of place, but it is minimal.

Finish: Light oak, dried corn, apple, cherry juice, caramel, cinnamon, …with the lightest bitter tinge which is ever-so-slightly detracting. The finish is quite full in terms of feel, and slowly fades and unpacks – and it is still fairly sweet. The oak also has a freshly charred and smoky quality which I very much enjoy. Also, overall, quite rich.

I find this whiskey very easy to drink, and it slips down without much of an issue. It’s light, fresh, fruity, with some light spice too. The oak, the soft fruit, and the floral nature of this bourbon – very very nice, and most definitely recommended. It also tends to get better the more you drink it....

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: High, based on $40.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2019

The nose has coconut, dried fruit, potpourri, and slightly smoky and oaky. The palate is slightly spicy, with a nice dried fruit character and a rich corn core. The finish is full of baking spice, fruit, tobacco, and oak which eventually dominates. It’s a rather short review, but I really wanted to have another go at this to see if I still liked it as much as last time – and I do.

Highly Recommended (49% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: High, based on $50 CAD - even better in the USA where you can find this for around $30 USD.