Scotch

Review: The Arran Port Cask Finish Single Malt Scotch Whisky by Jason Hambrey

ABV
50%
Aging
~8 Years, Finished in a port cask
Recipe
100% Malted Barley
Distiller Arran (Lochranza, Scotland)

An Arran, initially matured in “traditional whisky casks” before finishing. I assume that is just refill cask, but it could be just about any of your standard casks. As with a lot of the lower end Arrans, it’s priced pretty reasonably for what it is.


Review (2021)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2020

The base notes of arran are so nice – malty, light spicy, with some nice white pepper, apple, and fresh peach. It is just as you might expect – the port layers on fruit and spice in a very pleasant fashion. The layer of richness is very nice. On the palate, lightly oaky, sweet, with orchard fruits and a nice spicy, malty finish. The finish is fruity with a touch of spice. Dried fruits seem to carry the finish forward for a little while.

Very nice!

Highly Recommended (50% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average against the whisky market in general. High for Scotch.


Review: Arran The Bothy Quarter Cask by Jason Hambrey

ABV
56.2%
Aging
Ex-bourbon for 7 years, finished in quarter casks for another 2 years
Recipe
100% Malted Barley
Distiller Arran (Lochranza, Scotland)

A fairly cheap cask strength version of a single malt, going the route of finishing in quarter casks - given the woody influence of smaller casks combined with the ABV (which brings out more of the oak on the nose), you’d expect an oakier Scotch.


Review (2021)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2020

This has a very pleasant oakiness, with nice bourbon notes, apple, fresh peach, vanilla, a nice grassy barley character, and a touch of clove. It doesn’t disappoint on the palate either, with the fruits being very well supported by the oakiness. It’s big at cask strength – medium bodied – but the oak, sweetness, fruit, and grain are just about perfect for this percent of alcohol. So, the balance is there, the flavours are good – and this is pretty great Scotch, especially at this price (if you like higher ABV scotches).

A nice pairing for an amber beer, too.

Highly Recommended (50% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Average, against whisky as a whole – Scotch has trouble competing on a value basis. But, at $91, it’s hard to get a better cask strength single malt than this one.


Review: The Famous Grouse Blended Scotch Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Famous Grouse 1.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
Scottish Malt and Grain Whiskies
Distiller Multiple (Scotland)

The “Grouse Blend” was originally produced by Matthew Gloag, a grocer and wine merchant in Perth, Scotland. The blend was created in 1897, slightly after the big explosion of blends in Scottish whisky history. The blend became so popular that shortly it was renamed “The Famous Grouse”. Originally, it was likely supplied to sportsman who came to Glasgow to hunt. Now, it is the biggest selling blend in UK. It is produced by the same company that owns Macallan and Highland Park – who are big users of sherry casks, which does show up in this blend.


Review (2014)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2013

Nose: Lots of malty fruit, caramel is present, along with more malty notes and slightly sour notes reminiscent of irish pot still whisky. It’s also quite creamy and buttery, which I mainly noticed it while tasting alongside some others. I get aromas of tea as well (black pekoe) , a touch of cucumber, honey, light heather, orange, and some medicinal smells reminiscent of some peat, although I don’t smell much peat here.

Taste: Quite sweet, malty, and smooth with a surprising bit of prickly heat on my first sip. Malt seems to play center stage here, however – the backdrop is not so bad– some dried fruits (apricot and lots of raisin), slight spice, toffee, and a touch of salt. The sweetness carries on throughout the taste. The raisins seem to build and build. Peat comes in at the end (not smoke, but peat) and adds some earthiness and moss. Quite light – there’s some slight heat but not really much in the way of spices attached to it other than a touch of black pepper at the end. Additionally, the buttery-ness from the nose is here.

Finish: Malty, light, and sweet with a touch of dry-ness and slight fruitiness as well. The malt remains but isn’t that present, and there’s just a touch of spice and vanilla.

Has some good uses...I infused orange peel into this which mixes quite well.

Value: Low, even at a relatively low price. you can do better at bottom shelf prices, especially in North American whiskies.


Review (2021)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2020

I really never understood this one, or it’s popularity – until cocktails. What happens with ice – orange kick and the weaknesses get lost – or even add subtelty – amidst the other strong flavours in the cocktail.

The nose is a bit rough, with lots of nutty spirit that is youthful and a bit unpleasant (this is why I don’t return to this one often to sip) – but it does present some nice orange peel, heather, light touches of baking spice, orchard fruit, and mixed stone fruit. The palate has more orange peel, lots of honey, and a decent dash of malty notes. The finish sits with heather, honey, and orange peel – mainly. Short length, but longer than you might expect.

As you can see, I wasn’t too enthused to put together tasting notes for this, but I wanted to revisit it – this time, though to ask the question – what happens if you serve this straight up (chilled with a bit of dilution)? All of the sudden, the orange and honey intensify, and the weaknesses are muted into a light roughness which is appealing in a cocktail. The palate is focused on orange peel and nuttiness, and the finish is reduced to honey. It’s no wonder bartenders love the stuff – it’s pretty rare to have such an optimization happen with added ice, where the weaknesses fade and the strengths are enunciated clearly.

I often have a bottle of this, but not to sip – to mix. A penicillin cocktail is great with this, as are many old fashioned or sidecar variations.


Review: Octomore Single Malt Scotch Whisky by Jason Hambrey

Octomore 9pt1 1.jpg
ABV
~60%
Aging
Typically 5-7 yrs
Recipe
100% Malted Barley
Distiller Bruichladdich (Bruichladdich, Scotland)

This whisky generally represents the most heavily peated whisky in the world, in terms of parts per million of phenol (the peat flavor components) in the barley before the whisky is distilled. The peating levels vary - often around 170 ppm but one release 6.3 was peated to 258! For comparison, Port Charlotte is peated to 40 PPM and Caol Ila and Lagavulin are peated to about 30-45 ppm. That is a lot of peat!

It needs to be noted, however, that the peat level is measured when the barley is smoked - not after it is distilled. Thus, depending on how you distill, you can bring out more of the smoky or earthy character of the peat - or not much at all. So it isn't really a proper measure of how peaty a whisky is, but rather an indication of its potential. Above a certain level, as with bitterness units in beer, I imagine our palates can't distinguish any difference. The whisky is expensive, but only 5 years old - it is a delicate balance with peat because the smokiness of a whisky will decrease with years in the cask - so it can be a balance of peatiness and maturity.


Review (2016)

  • Batch: 6.1 (57% ABV)

  • Bottling Code: P/132371 26 MAR 14

  • Bottling Date: 2014

This batch was peated to 167 ppm and matured in an ex-bourbon cask.

The nose is full of smoke – not only from the peat but also seemingly from the barrel char, slightly. Incredibly earthy, too – with sharp peat, salt, brine, apricot, honey, bourbon barrel char (sure enough, it’s an ex-bourbon cask!), and porridge. The palate is thick and spicy, with lots of brown sugar and caramel alongside peppery peat, caramel, smoke, and chilli flakes. And rich chocolate mousse. It’s pretty soft for 57%! The finish has incredible marine, mineral, and peat character. Dark chocolate, clove, cinnamon (like mayan hot chocolate), white pepper, rockpools, and of course smoke, moss, and damp earth. This really is a clear cut representation of peat – really quite brilliant stuff.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Low at $230.


Review (2016)

  • Batch: 7.1 (59.5% ABV, 208 PPM)

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2015

This octomore is big, smoky, earthy, and strongly youthful. The peat is sharp and rich, with interesting notes also of dried brown rice and bubblegum. Yet, the rich peat is incredibly balanced with the sweet toffee, brown sugar, and hazlenut skins. The finish is rich, earthy, smoky, and salty. Awesome stuff.

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Low at $225.


Review (2016)

  • Batch: 7.3 Islay Barley (60% ABV)

  • Bottling Code: L/150264 15/218 10 05 15 12155114

  • Bottling Date: 2015

The barley in this release was sourced from James Brown’s Octomore farm. Distilled in 2010 from grain harvested at Lorgba field, peated to 169 ppm, and matured on Islay in American bourbon barrels and Spanish wine casks of Ribuera del Duero.

I do quite like most things Bruichladdich does. Here, extreme peat…extremely marine, and not as smoky as one might expect – though very peaty and farmy. Friends of mine have described this in terms of various animals – cows, sheep, etc. – lots of complexity and it’s not a grimy spirit by any means. I’d love to visit Islay as this is likely a whisky where terroir would come in – the surroundings, how it is matured, the landscape. Brilliant whisky.

Well, I suppose on to more proper tasting notes – lots of spice, lots of minerality, toasted sesame, and vegetal notes not unlike some clean mezcals. Long, and complex, drying as well. Iodine, milky tea, smoke, toffee, apricot, seaweed, salt stone, preserved lemons, smoke, vanilla, and light creaminess, with time. Ginger and melon on the palate, and melds so well with the earthy barley, peat, menthol, and smoke – finishes with lots of maritime character, spice, mixed dried fruit, the lightest touch touch of oxidized wine, and smoke. Brilliant, from start to very long finish.

Very Highly Recommended (18% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher). It’s a hair breadth away from “exceptional”, though.

Value: Low. Pricy stuff.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: 8.1 Masterclass (59.5% ABV, 167 PPM, first fill ex-bourbon barrels)

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2017

Sooty, and intensely earthy – moreso than smoky. Rich, and deep, too – it is very much like a faceplant into peat. Spicy, too – cacao, cinnamon, and nutmeg. There is a light bracing of vanilla and oak, too – with yellow apples and pears gradually making a slight presence on the nose, too. My reference on this tasting is Octomore 7.3 – that one is much smokier, yet just as earthy – and more oily.

The palate is richly earthy, as one might expect, and very peaty. The orchard fruit and a sweet creaminess slightly offset the deep earth of the peat, and we have rich dark chocolate coming in too. Interestingly, Chinese 5-spice (with pronounced anise) and orange peel too.

The finish is so rich in peat, it tastes like I actually just chewed and spit out the funkiest peat you can imagine. Some light cinnamon and oak, but it is very much about the peat.

It’s quite complex in terms of the incredibly rich earthiness, so much so that I don’t have the vocab to fully describe it. It’s balanced, but not that broad in a way that some of the better Octomores are - not nearly as gorgeous as the magnificent 7.3, which composes a symphony compared to this one solo. Still, very good.

Also, goes very well with hoppy beers, if you were ever wondering…

Highly Recommended (48% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Low (almost average) at $135. And yes, $135 was a steal….


Review (2021)

  • Batch: 9.1 Dialogos (59.1% ABV, 156 PPM, ex-bourbon barrels)

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2018

42,000 bottles of this stuff were made. The casks were from a variety of bourbons: 51% Jim Beam, 26% Jack Daniels,15% Jim Beam (Clermont), Old-Gran Dad 8%.

The nose is rich, salty, sharp, and earthy. There is a really nice raw grain character to it and the minerality is awesome. It’s very savoury – I get olives, oysters, seaweed, pickled lemons, thyme, anchovies – but vanilla dances in and out throughout, showing its versatility.

The palate is smoky, smoky, smoky, with a bit less earth than the other Octomores I’ve had. Indeed, it is a bit cleaner. Toasted hazlenuts, sea spray, black wrinkly olives, dried apple, wet earth, and rich cacao. The finish is, as one would expect, farmy, smoky, earthy, and lightly sweet.

A very nice Islay, and terrific for the price I found it at (~$130) – but it doesn’t have some of the depth and richness of other bottlings I’ve tried. But it still does the trick, as usual…

Highly Recommended (50% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Relatively, for an octomore, pretty good at $130. But, it’s a lot of money against the whisky market in general, and it’d be on the lower end of average there.


Review: Isle of Jura 18 year old Single Malt Scotch Whisky by Jason Hambrey

ABV
44%
Aging
Matured in ex-bourbon casks for 18 years and finished in Bordeaux wine casks
Recipe
100% Malted Barley
Distiller Jura (Craighouse, Scotland)

Now how about the 18?


Review (2020)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2019

Gorgeous nose. Quite elegant – beautiful fruit, stewed apples, apricot preserves, almonds, and with a touch of smoke. After a great nose, the palate doesn’t measure up, being pretty dominated by smoke and losing some of the resolution of complexity from the nose – but it regains it on the finish which mixes light peat, smoke, with stewed fruit (apple, pear, apricot) is great. It has a bit of sweet tart (the candy), always an odd character in whisky I find – I’ve only found it in appreciable quantities in some old bowmores.

This nearly was ranked a notch up, but the palate just isn’t quite there. Still, a fantastic dram.

Highly Recommended (49% of all whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: Low, at $150.