Prescott

Review: King's Lock Smuggler's Gold Rum by Jason Hambrey

King's Lock Gold Rum.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
N/A
Distiller King's Lock (Prescott, ON)

This is an older version of the King's Lock Moonshine.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2017

Definitely more oak (or bourbon?) than the standard 100 islands. It actually comes off with more bourbon than rum characteristics on the nose. The cask characteristic has become a much bigger part of the whole here. Still biscuity, with light fruit highlights underneath on the nose – but toffee, light smoke, and caramel are added in. Light oak, toffee, and a tannic structure is provided from the oak – leading to a palate which is dry, with some wood-smoke and light oak too. The finish comes on with the rum, with light molasses, sweetness, and the berry fruitiness typical in many rums.  Light spice and smoke on the finish.

I’m not actually sure if I like it more than the moonshine. It’s different – more oak and smoke – and more mature – but also a bit less balanced, which I expect will be fixed with more age. Quite light, and a bit unclear on vision – the cask is a bit too dominant for the spirit. I would have matured it in a re-used rum cask to develop cask character and preserve the delicateness of the spirit.

Value: Low. As with most micro-distilled products, it’s hard for this to compete with the big producers.


Review: King's Lock 1000 Islands Moonshine by Jason Hambrey

King's Lock Moonshine.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
N/A
Distiller King's Lock (Prescott, ON)

I typically think of moonshine as a grain spirit off the still (not completely true - it refers to white spirits in general distilled illegally) - but this is not a grain spirit but rather from molasses - fine by me since it doesn't need as much age to start tasting good...it is aged, as well - they have another version, Lighthouse shine, that is unaged.

I find a lot of rums from big distilleries in Canada to be quite sweet, so I've enjoyed exploring some of these rums from small Canadian producers (some I quite like: Blackstrap and Leatherback Special Reserve).


Review (2018)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2017

Definitely more oak (or bourbon?) than the standard 100 islands. It actually comes off with more bourbon than rum characteristics on the nose. The cask characteristic has become a much bigger part of the whole here. Still biscuity, with light fruit highlights underneath on the nose – but toffee, light smoke, and caramel are added in. Light oak, toffee, and a tannic structure is provided from the oak – leading to a palate which is dry, with some wood-smoke and light oak too. The finish comes on with the rum, with light molasses, sweetness, and the berry fruitiness typical in many rums.  Light spice and smoke on the finish.

I’m not actually sure if I like it more than the moonshine. It’s different – more oak and smoke – and more mature – but also a bit less balanced, which I expect will be fixed with more age. Quite light, and a bit unclear on vision – the cask is a bit too dominant for the spirit. I would have matured it in a re-used rum cask to develop cask character and preserve the delicateness of the spirit.

Assessment: Recommended, if you like exploring white spirits.

Value: Average. It’s not expensive (28$) and it’s a pretty decent spirit.


Review: King's Lock Whiskyjack Rye by Jason Hambrey

King's Lock WhiskyJack 2.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
N/A
Recipe
100% Rye
Distiller King's Lock (Prescott, ON)

A young rye (not a whisky yet), so a version of their white rye which is a bit further down the road.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: 2
  • Bottling Code: N/A
  • Bottling Date: ~2017

Still dominated by the spicy, cedar notes of the new make but now with some toffee and light oak influence. Quite pronounced toffee and nutty notes to add in to the new make. It’s softer than the new make, but it’s still quite untamed.

Nut oil - the palate carries the tamed notes of the rye new make – cedar, pine nuts, cinnamon, clove – but with oak and toffee woven in. Doesn’t nearly have the raw-ness of the new make (which is good) but is showing a good direction. Light toffee and cask sweetness fit in well. It’s clear the new make (which has characteristics I quite like) is moving a good direction in the cask.

The finish has light vanilla, mixed roasted nuts, and pine nuts. Still a good set of pine and cedar notes, and a touch of oak too. The cask certainly needs some more time to work some magic (it doesn’t appear to be new oak), but it's coming along.


Review: King's Lock Prescott White Rye by Jason Hambrey

King's Lock White Rye 2.jpg
ABV
40%
Aging
None
Recipe
100% Rye
Distiller King's Lock (Prescott, ON)

This is a new make spirit, essentially whisky spirit right off the still after it is watered down. It is made from 100% organic Ontario rye, double distilled to about 85% - so fairly light, produced in a new trend-setting wave of micro-distillers who have an eye on the environment and sustainability.


Review (2018)

  • Batch: 3
  • Bottling Code: N/A
  • Bottling Date: ~2017

Sharp, raw, spicy, and earthy – with lots of deep grain characteristic. I have a few friends who love this – the earthy and spicy and „naked” characteristics displayed in the spirit. There is something about it that is nostalgic. Pine, fir, clove, cedar, linseed oil, hazlenut oil, white pepper. There is something of a solvent cleaner characteristic on the nose which I expect barrel char will tame – but it’s not necessarily negative.

The palate has a bit of unripe orange (think of sharp, almost spicy, unsweet oranges or perhaps orange peel), a peppery spiciness, arugula, and more cedar. The finish is light, with nut oil and a plethora of spices – pepper and clove in particular. I do love pine and cedar notes, and this has a very pleasant earthy and grainy characteristic.

There is something appealing about this new make and the raw spicy and cedar notes which fill it up. I’m interested to see how this develops.