Juniper

Review: Newfoundland Seaweed Gin by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
None
Recipe
Spirit, Dulse Seaweed, Juniper, and Savoury
Distiller Newfoundland Distillery (Clarke's Beach, Newfoundland)

Newfoundland Distillery produces two gins, one focused on cloudberry (an inland flavor) and this one, focused on dulse seaweed (a maritime flavor) with some savoury and juniper as well. You often see gin loaded with multiple ingredients, but this is just about three simple and deep flavours.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2019

This is fairly marine in character, with sea-spray, sweet and oily grain spirit, and some juniper in the background. It’s probably the gin with the most seaside character that I’ve ever tasted – quite remarkable. It’s slightly sweet on the palate, and has a nice honeycomb character as well as a nice, delicate woodiness. The savoury is perfect, here. Spices come through quite richly at the end – slightly bitter spices like clove, with a light drying nature. It works a nice trick! Caramel comes through at the end too.

Works really well in cocktails, especially lighter gin cocktails where the marine character really pops (like, for instance, a cocktail made with basil, elderflower, soda, and a bit of lime).

Assessment: Highly recommended.

Value: High, if you like premium gins. $35 isn’t bad for that.


Review: Newfoundland Cloudberry Gin by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
None
Recipe
Spirit, Cloudberry, Juniper, and Savoury
Distiller Newfoundland Distillery (Clarke's Beach, Newfoundland)

If you notice, most of Newfoundland’s products are centred around three ingredients, often with one local and unique ingredient - roses and kelp (their Rose & Gunpower rum), chaga mushrooms (their Chaga rum), dulse seaweed (their seaweed gin), or - in this case - cloudberries. Cloudberries grow in Newfoundland, and taste (I’m told) similar to a blackberry or raspberry and are a big delicacy in Scandinavia and fetch high prices. However, they aren’t widely cultivated. This gin is made with just three botanicals - juniper, savoury, and cloudberry. It’s rare to see a “bridge” in gin between the juniper and the brighter fruit character other than coriander, but savoury plays a really nice trick and it’s a very different play on traditional gin.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2019

There is a real woody-juniper nature to this one, reminding me more of juniper wood than the berries themselves. Big herbal characters blend into woody juniper and dense, dried mixed berry notes. Simple, clean, balanced, and elegant. Very well put together, and I like how the grain character comes through but it’s still a very clean spirit and I like the centrality of the herbal notes here – many gins are focused on citrus, spice, or juniper and not many venture this far into the herbal side of things. Savoury, also, is one of my favourite herbs…

The finish carries the herbal notes quite nicely, along with a bit more intense wood.rit.

Assessment: Highly recommended.

Value: High, if you like premium gins. $35 isn’t bad for that.


Review: Newfoundland Aquavit by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
None
Recipe
Barley Spirit, Peat-smoked juniper, and honey
Distiller Newfoundland Distillery (Clarke's Beach, Newfoundland)

I don’t often go after unaged spirits, but this one caught my eye on a beer coaster which was advertising this product - it is made with peat-smoked juniper, barley spirit, and honey. I’ve tried some other Aquavits I quite liked this year, and it’s a category I think which could be explored more. Peat-smoked juniper? Yes, I want to try that.

This, notably, was the first spirit produced in Newfoundland which has been fully grown and legally distilled in the province.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: 2019

The nose has a rich grain character, smoke, juniper, lemons, and a light mineral essence. I like the grain-forward nature of the spirit. I really haven’t had a spirit quite like this before – it is perhaps like some smoky whisky new makes that are quite smooth, but it’s quite different as well. It has a really nice savouriness to it, almost like roasted tomatoes. Or, perhaps – smoked tomatoes (you can buy these, but they aren’t easy to find…). The smoke really comes through on the palate, at the end – a bit like a meat smoker with cherry wood.

This is a complex, interesting, and unique spirit – it has endless application in cocktails. I can just imagine great pairings with tomato, dried apricot, fresh stone fruits, or honey and soda.

This aquavit and Sheringham’s are both terrific – I think more distilleries should pursue this type of spirit.

Assessment: Highly recommended.

Value: High, if you like smoke and unique spirits. $35 isn’t bad for that.