Black Velvet

Review: Black Velvet Onyx 12 Years Old Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
12 Years; Ex-bourbon
Recipe
N/A
Distiller Black Velvet (Lethbridge, Alberta)

It’s too bad - we don’t get to see many older whiskies out of the Black Velvet distillery, which produces some nice stuff - the old Danfield’s line, especially the 21 year old, was fantastic. But here is one - 12 years, a step above the 8 year old Black Velvet Reserve, and showcasing a bit more of what Black Velvet can do.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2018

Balanced, light, broad and integrated. Very nice mix of grain, oak, and loads of spice at the end. Maple cookies! There is more: lots of blueberry, apple, and butterscotch. The palate has a nice richness, spiciness, and dryness to it. A very nice whisky! Well blended and quite enjoyable.

The most interesting part about this whisky is that it reminds me of older vintage Canadian whiskies I’ve had from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. It has a distinct funk to it, almost like a mustiness, that is subtle – but present.

Recommended (81% of whiskies I’ve reviewed to date get this recommendation or higher).

Value: N/A. I couldn’t figure out what this cost. But it’s worth about $67 in the overall whisky market (heavily influenced by the high prices of Scotch) and in the Canadian whisky market probably $35-40 as Canadian whisky (and American whisky) typically offers a better palate experience and complexity per dollar than Scotch.


Review: Black Velvet Reserve 8 Years Old Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

ABV
40%
Aging
8 Years; Ex-bourbon
Recipe
N/A
Distiller Black Velvet (Lethbridge, Alberta)

A “reserve” version of black velvet which has spent an additional 5 years in casks - it is indeed a huge step up. Not available in Ontario but available in some other parts of Canada and in the USA.


Review (2019)

  • Batch: N/A

  • Bottling Code: N/A

  • Bottling Date: ~2018

Fairly subtle…light spice, light wood, light grain, light pine. It also has some nice white wine and herbal notes. The nuances are bourbon-like, with vanilla and dried fruit coming through – but also spicy notes, peach, and a thread of floral notes. Very much in the style of a classic Canadian whisky (not necessarily a modern one, though), with a light complexity to a whisky which is light-bodied with a spicy edge.

This reminds me of a Crown Royal, but, other than Danfield’s products, I don’t have much experience of better black velvet products. Definitely deeper and rounder than the standard BV, and it’s more like a Crown royal in terms of creaminess, vanilla, and brighter fruits like grape and gooseberry – like the limited edition, perhaps – but it isn’t quite as creamy and it sits a bit on the spicier side.

If you don’t have access to much Canadian whisky and you are wanting to explore, this is not a bad place to start getting exposure – but see if you can find any whiskies which I recommend more highly on my highest rating page.

Value: I’m not sure, as I couldn’t find prices online against my typical benchmarks. Against the whisky market (including Scotch, which drags the market up due to its high price for a given quality of taste) this is worth about $40, so I expect this is good value although I couldn’t find values online. I’d pay $26-30 for it, and I expect it’s even below that in the US.


Review: Schenley Golden Wedding Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

This whisky is a marriage of three whiskies, of different ages, to create a whisky which has both the body and complexity of an older whisky and the bite of a younger one. It’s been around for a long time – since 1856. For some time, this was produced at the Valleyfield distillery in Quebec, but now it is produced partially in Lethbridge at the Black Velvet distillery (for the flavoring/strongly flavoured components of the blend) and partially at Valleyfield for the base/body components.

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Review: Schenley OFC Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

This whisky has also been around forever. According to the bottle, OFC stands for “Original Fine Canadian”. The back of the bottle references 25 gold medals in 27 competitions of Monde Selection, dating back all the way to Paris in 1973. Impressive. However, I did wonder what monde selection was – it’s an international quality competition that evaluates everything from wine, spirits, and beer to soft drinks and other food products. Online, it was hard to find exactly how OFC did, and when they last won – and, frankly, how prestigious those awards are.

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Review: Black Velvet Deluxe Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

This whisky was first made in 1951, by master distiller Jack Napier. He called in “Black Velvet” after loving the taste. It is distilled in the Black Velvet distillery in Lethbridge, Alberta, even though originally it was distilled at a Toronto distillery where demand caused a new distillery to be built in Alberta. It is “blended at birth”, which involves blending an aged 90% rye whisky (aged 2 years) with corn spirit right off the still before being put into Buffalo Trace bourbon barrels. This whisky is extremely popular in the US – less so in Canada, and can even be hard to find in Ontario.

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Review: Danfield's 21 Year Old Canadian Whisky by Jason Hambrey

This is one of my favourite Canadian whiskies, coming out of the Black Velvet distillery in Lethbridge, Alberta. Generally, it is recognized as their premium sipper, although a younger version is also available. It claims to be “diamond filtered” but based on what I have gathered, no one really knows that that is. Despite what that process may or may not be, it is one of my favourite Canadians and is always a treat.

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